Affiliate marketing is an area that even the most seasoned bloggers can improve upon. Plus, most bloggers aren't making anywhere near the amount of affiliate income that they should be and are leaving money on the table. If you want to grow your affiliate income, there are numerous tips and strategies that I share in Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing.
I got a question about the funnel. You were talking about the first page to be a blog page. I interpreted it as having you own blog(website), that should compete with other expert website. I was wondering if the first step of your funnel can be the opt-in page. The blogs that refers to the opt-in page are guestblogposts on expert websites, so multiple ways of traffic and seo. So you are only building an opt-in page, thank you page, landing pages etc on your website, but no blog to become an expert. Is that something you can do? Or is that not Google friendly or most expert websites are against?
When promoting affiliate offers, just make sure you are fully aware of all the terms and conditions attached to your affiliate program. Some programs can be strict about how they allow you to promote their products. For example, some may limit you to banner ads and links only, while others will allow you to use paid advertising, but won't allow email marketing. 
As of 2014, ClickBank has more than six-million clients and distributes in 190 countries and has carved out a niche in being an easy-to-use platform for entrepreneurs and businesses, enabling powerful online and mobile commerce across a wide variety of lifestyle categories.[6] In August 2014, ClickBank handled approximately 30,000 transactions daily.[2]
Let's do a little reality check here, I highly doubt you can buy traffic on Fiverr and have it convert on any ClickBank offer. Quality traffic is not acquired on Fiverr (that's for sure). Focus on building a value adding funnel like described in the post rather than looking for a shortcut. You can't just spend 5 bucks to make 40 in 5 minutes, I'd be a billionaire otherwise :).

So an effective affiliate marketing program requires some forethought. The terms and conditions have to be tight, especially if the contract agreement is to pay for traffic rather than sales. The potential for fraud in affiliate marketing is a possibility. Unscrupulous affiliates can squat on domain names with misspellings and get a commission for the redirect; they can populate online registration forms with fake or stolen information; they can purchase adwords on search terms the company already ranks high on, and so on. Even if the terms and conditions are clear, an affiliate marketing program requires that someone be monitoring affiliates and enforcing the rules. In exchange for that effort, however, a company can access motivated, creative people to help sell their product or services to the world.


The topic you choose must have enough depth that you can create a lot of content for it. This is important for building an authoritative site, for search engine optimization, and most importantly, for the end user. If you don't have enough content about a topic, you're not going to be taken very seriously as an authority on the topic and it's unlikely you can convince someone to make a purchase from you. 
Spam is the biggest threat to organic search engines, whose goal is to provide quality search results for keywords or phrases entered by their users. Google's PageRank algorithm update ("BigDaddy") in February 2006—the final stage of Google's major update ("Jagger") that began in mid-summer 2005—specifically targeted spamdexing with great success. This update thus enabled Google to remove a large amount of mostly computer-generated duplicate content from its index.[29]

Tip: Aim for products with reasonable commission. No lower than let’s say 40 percent, to make your efforts worthwhile. Also, you should note that ClickBank deducts transaction fees from a sale. Here’s a calculator to help you calculate your actual commission. More so, you need to remember to disclose all your affiliate links and mark them as nofollow. Here are a few reasons as to why you need to do this.
What this article teaches you is that if you produce something that is shareable and interesting, driving traffic to it is MUCH easier. You can use social media, you can run link building, you can share it on niche communities and nobody is going to ban it or downvote it. Actually, if your front end is great value, people will share it around without you asking. Then all you have to do is offer a free downloadable resource in this piece of content (that does not decrease its shareability as it's more free goodies) and THEN start selling via email follow up.

Thanks! I have a few products mixed into my blog posts, and will be adding more. I have found CB to be a mixed bag so far - but need more time to see how it pans out. Also wondering about setting up more sites to follow the funnel you set up. I was pleased to hear you mention having 3 follow ups in the responder sequence. Someone else had suggested 10! I figured by 4 or 5 you lost them anyway.
The terms of an affiliate marketing program are set by the company wanting to advertise. Early on, companies were largely paying cost per click (traffic) or cost per mile (impressions) on banner advertisements. As the technology evolved, the focus turned to commissions on actual sales or qualified leads. The early affiliate marketing programs were vulnerable to fraud because clicks could be generated by software, as could impressions.
After being accepted into an affiliate program, marketers receive a unique URL that includes their affiliate ID. They share that unique URL with their subscribers, site visitors, and social networks via text links or ads. When someone clicks on that link, affiliate software records that click and any resulting product sales in the affiliate’s account. When commissions reach a pre-determined threshold, the affiliate is paid.
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