If you are an affiliate looking to monetize your online presence with affiliate marketing, this section of the course will help you with affiliate program suggestions, which include Amazon affiliate program, eBay affiliate program, etc. For each program, you will see highlights regarding the perks they provide (such as cookie life, commission percent, etc.).
If you’re a blogger, start by going through your analytics and finding your most popular posts. In Google Analytics (GA) you can find these pages by going to your GA Dashboard > Behavior > Site Content > All Pages. Examine the ones at the top of the list that bring in the most traffic. Are there any affiliate products or services you can naturally include in them?
Both merchants and affiliates need a plan on how to implement affiliate marketing in their online presence, how to develop a strategy to increase performance, as well as to explore benefits they can achieve with this kind of promotion. Each of these concepts is covered in this course. Management of an affiliate program is a chapter dedicated to merchants with tips on how to monitor the program and successfully communicate with the affiliates. Suggestions on popular affiliate programs to join is a chapter for affiliates where they can find interesting affiliate programs, alongside some of the most important features for each of them.
Affiliate marketing overlaps with other Internet marketing methods to some degree, because affiliates often use regular advertising methods. Those methods include organic search engine optimization (SEO), paid search engine marketing (PPC – Pay Per Click), e-mail marketing, content marketing, and (in some sense) display advertising. On the other hand, affiliates sometimes use less orthodox techniques, such as publishing reviews of products or services offered by a partner.[citation needed]
Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[35] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks.
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