On the other hand, we have affiliates, who are looking for ways to monetize their online presence. Affiliates (also known as publishers) are often bloggers and influencers who enjoy online reputation and a considerable following. This enables them to affect buying decisions of their followers. When they recommend a product, they encourage their followers to buy the same products. This activity is known as a conversion, and it is what enables affiliates to earn from this kind of strategy.
When there are multiple affiliates involved in one transaction, payment gets much more complicated. Sometimes it’s even possible for affiliates to jump in at the last minute and claim commissions for customers brought in by other affiliates. Successful programs use multi-channel attribution to ensure the affiliates that create the most value get paid the most.
So an effective affiliate marketing program requires some forethought. The terms and conditions have to be tight, especially if the contract agreement is to pay for traffic rather than sales. The potential for fraud in affiliate marketing is a possibility. Unscrupulous affiliates can squat on domain names with misspellings and get a commission for the redirect; they can populate online registration forms with fake or stolen information; they can purchase adwords on search terms the company already ranks high on, and so on. Even if the terms and conditions are clear, an affiliate marketing program requires that someone be monitoring affiliates and enforcing the rules. In exchange for that effort, however, a company can access motivated, creative people to help sell their product or services to the world.
Affiliate marketing currently lacks industry standards for training and certification. There are some training courses and seminars that result in certifications; however, the acceptance of such certifications is mostly due to the reputation of the individual or company issuing the certification. Affiliate marketing is not commonly taught in universities, and only a few college instructors work with Internet marketers to introduce the subject to students majoring in marketing.[37]
Over the past two years, I have been nothing but overwhelmed with internet and affiliate marketing. I think I am like many beginning internet marketers. Try every tool and every internet marketing guru's advice because they promise the world and make it seem so easy. Cost? Huge. Results? Few. When I came across Pat Flynn I felt there was something different. He just seemed real to me. So, I decided to try Pat's 1·2·3 Affiliate Marketing course. His course was much less expensive than others I've paid for. I'm half-way through the course and I finally finished my site and made a sale. I have regained my faith and really enjoy the white hat aspect of affiliate marketing. I feel like Pat really cares about us, which is unique in this business.
Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[35] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks.
×