MY biggest struggle is knowing how to put the promotion together and having everything in place when you promote it. I would kill for a Step-by-Step hold your hand and let me show you once how to do it correctly Mapped Blueprint. I have seen lots of sales pages but when you get them from the vendor they look a lot of the times nothing like the Org sales page, have never written a sales page before and it becomes overwhelming and confusing and then totally frustrating
When promoting affiliate offers, just make sure you are fully aware of all the terms and conditions attached to your affiliate program. Some programs can be strict about how they allow you to promote their products. For example, some may limit you to banner ads and links only, while others will allow you to use paid advertising, but won't allow email marketing. 
2nd tier.  If you are an affiliate for a particular program and you refer others to sign up for that affiliate program, a 2nd tier program will pay you when the affiliates you referred make sales. For example, I am an affiliate for Ultimate Bundles. If you join their affiliate program via my 2nd tier affiliate link here. I will get a small percentage of any sales you make going forward.
You are also protected by 60 Days  Money Back Guarantee so your purchase is risk free and you are safe.If you don't like this course, or for any other reason, you can just ask for your money back within 60-Days and that's it - you get a refund, no questions asked.As you can see, you can't lose here. Take it for a trial, if you don't like the product just ask for your money back.
This is a very common way to promote offers. For example, you will often see a blog post with links to certain products or services. If the reader clicks through and makes a purchase, the blog owner will make a commission. These in-text links blend in with other content on your site and are a great way of promoting an offer within your content, without being over-the-top salesy with banners. 
Justine has managed affiliate programs for companies such as Shopify and Freshbooks. She is able to give this course a fresh prospective - from that of an affiliate manager! This is an amazing bonus that will show you how to always get approved to an affiliate program. She has assessed thousands of applications over the years and there's a lot that goes into the yes/no.
Clickbank, huh... now that's a name I haven't heard in a while! I remember messing around with them back in 2011 when I was a newbie. Never did make any money with them, haha, but I've seen plenty of people who have! I've just never been any good at pushing the weight loss stuff, which I'm pretty sure is where most people make their money with Clickbank.
#1 Geared more towards selling on the Amazon Affiliate Program.  One small downside I noticed with this course was that it was geared more towards selling products through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Don’t get me wrong Amazon’s affiliate program is great but there is so much more out there.  However, all the info in this course can be applied to almost any other affiliate program.
If this looks like a product that you might want to promote, you want to head over to your spreadsheet and enter all the information here in the different categories. Of course, you want to take a good look at the sales page to make sure that product is a good fit for your audience. To do that, click on the link at the top of the box. In this case, the sales page is a video, which is very common for Clickbank products. You just want to watch the video and see if it’s something that your audience would appreciate. If you get to the point where the product seems like a good fit, the sales page is a good fit, then you want to buy the product just to make sure. A lot of times on Clickbank, there are products with really great sales pages that make all these promises, and then when you buy the product, it’s actually not very good. Just to make sure you don’t burn any bridges with your audience, just buy the product. It’s usually pretty affordable, just to make sure that it’s something that they will appreciate if they end up investing in it.
In February 2000, Amazon announced that it had been granted a patent[14] on components of an affiliate program. The patent application was submitted in June 1997, which predates most affiliate programs, but not PC Flowers & Gifts.com (October 1994), AutoWeb.com (October 1995), Kbkids.com/BrainPlay.com (January 1996), EPage (April 1996), and several others.[9]
#1  Full of Valuable Advice, Tips, and Strategies.  One of my favorite parts of the course is all the tips and strategies Michelle gives.  Her tips on creating tutorials to make more sales to the Pinterest strategy she uses are solid and powerful.  A lot of times I will review her course an take just one idea and implement it. When it comes down to it this is not one of those courses that you go through once but rather one that you will revisit over and over.
Don’t exhaust all the information about the product with your link. Offer enough information to your readers so they know what the link is, but I don’t recommend giving too much detail on your own site for a two reasons. First, product information, like price, often changes. If you mention the price on your site and someone clicks over and finds a different price, it’s confusing. Second, many times, the product details and features are better explained by the makers of the product. It’s best to stick to your own experience on your site.
I have developed what I think is a pretty cool 11-part auto responder series that solves a critical problem people have in my niche - it includes a number of affiliate links as well (although not clickbank - yet). I currently have a squeeze page set up which I'm driving traffic to through using FB ads, but I'm finding that I'm having to pay way too much for every conversion ( > $1.50 per conversion).
Some merchants run their own (in-house) affiliate programs using dedicated software, while others use third-party intermediaries to track traffic or sales that are referred from affiliates. There are two different types of affiliate management methods used by merchants: standalone software or hosted services, typically called affiliate networks. Payouts to affiliates or publishers can be made by the networks on behalf of the merchant, by the network, consolidated across all merchants where the publisher has a relationship with and earned commissions or directly by the merchant itself.

The phrase, "Affiliates are an extended sales force for your business", which is often used to explain affiliate marketing, is not completely accurate. The primary difference between the two is that affiliate marketers provide little if any influence on a possible prospect in the conversion process once that prospect is directed to the advertiser's website. The sales team of the advertiser, however, does have the control and influence up to the point where the prospect either a) signs the contract, or b) completes the purchase.
If you are an affiliate looking to monetize your online presence with affiliate marketing, this section of the course will help you with affiliate program suggestions, which include Amazon affiliate program, eBay affiliate program, etc. For each program, you will see highlights regarding the perks they provide (such as cookie life, commission percent, etc.).

Totally awesome Gael. Thank you so much for sharing. Yes, the per-engagement presell sequence strategy is the way to go in 2015 - pulling folk in with front end value content building that all important relationship factor and enticing them to opt in for more..., then offering them a solution at a lower price as it's the first offer on TY page...and then promoting the opt in throughout your posts starting out with the problem, then turning it into finding the solution (as you have done above, lol!), plus Outbrain to LINK relative content, AND get affiliates on board + repeat with many blog posts and many offers, specially ads via FB and Pinterest Pin posts - man this is a powerful win-win. Makes SO much sense to me - am doing this right from NOW...Will be following your CB success and I'll report back mine... R.
Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[35] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks.
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