The topic you choose must have enough depth that you can create a lot of content for it. This is important for building an authoritative site, for search engine optimization, and most importantly, for the end user. If you don't have enough content about a topic, you're not going to be taken very seriously as an authority on the topic and it's unlikely you can convince someone to make a purchase from you. 
The other things you want to pay attention to are these little icons. If you hover over them, they actually explain them. It basically shows the language, whether it’s one-time billing, recurring billing, or both, so if you see both icons it’s both; whether they have a $1 trial, which is a feature that not all products in Clickbank have, whether there is PitchPlus, which is basically an up-sell, and finally, whether or not they have basically a separate HopLink target URL, which is your affiliate link that can bring people to a mobile-optimized page. You can have your regular HopLink which will take people to the general sales page, or if they have this special one, it means they have a link that will go directly to a page that’s designed for mobile devices. This isn’t really crucial unless you have a lot of people that use mobile devices, plus more and more sales pages are responsive, so you don’t really have to worry about this.
So many webmasters overlook this critical component of a successful site. However, it is one that is easily corrected. A complete course in copywriting is outside the scope of this article, but to point you in the right direction, I would suggest that you start with "Tested Advertising Methods" by John Caples, followed by "Web Copy That Sells" by Maria Veloso.

Cookie stuffing involves placing an affiliate tracking cookie on a website visitor's computer without their knowledge, which will then generate revenue for the person doing the cookie stuffing. This not only generates fraudulent affiliate sales but also has the potential to overwrite other affiliates' cookies, essentially stealing their legitimately earned commissions.
I was on the fence about joining 1·2·3 Affiliate Marketing because I felt like I pretty much knew everything that I needed to know about affiliate marketing already. I was already getting several hundred dollars per month in commissions, but I decided that, knowing Pat, I would give it a chance. Boy was it worthwhile. Pat goes so far beyond any of the other materials I've seen out there. So many great suggestion for active promotions. If you want to be successful with affiliate marketing, this course is a must-buy!
Since you’re essentially a freelancer, you get ultimate independence in setting your own goals, redirecting your path when you feel so inclined, choosing the products that interest you, and even determining your own hours. This convenience means you can diversify your portfolio if you like or focus solely on simple and straightforward campaigns. You’ll also be free from company restrictions and regulations as well as ill-performing teams.
The Instructor, Theo McArthur is an entrepreneur, amazon seller, investor as well as expert online marketer. Having been working on this domain since 1995, she now truly enjoys helping others learn life changing techniques and business models. Having created numerous ‘authority’ blogs to promote affiliate products over the years, she is perfectly placed to teach you the tricks involved in kick starting and enhancing your affiliate business. Along with all this, she’s also been selling stuff on Amazon and runs her own e-commerce venture. All in all, this is as much experience as you can ever wish for in a trainer. Hope you are able to make the most of this training program.
"I have to tell you, I took the course and have implemented her strategies and am already seeing results. There are some courses I have taken and have wondered what I learned after I took it. That is not the case with this course. This is one of those courses you won’t regret taking. Michelle knows what she is talking about when it comes to affiliate marketing and she has results to prove it. She brings in over $50,000 a month in affiliate income alone. And now she is teaching us how we can do the same thing." - Crystal, Blogger, HappilyEverUncluttered.com
I, too, have always looked at ClickBank as a secondary and even tertiary monetization source. But it can be a great sources of revenue. I linked one of my articles to a related product on CB, and without really doing promotion or anything unusual, I get a few sales a week. Mind you, the keyword(s) for the post aren't that huge either. So, even though the traffic not huge on that post, it still manages to get some sales.
Two-tier programs exist in the minority of affiliate programs; most are simply one-tier. Referral programs beyond two-tier resemble multi-level marketing (MLM) or network marketing but are different: Multi-level marketing (MLM) or network marketing associations tend to have more complex commission requirements/qualifications than standard affiliate programs.[citation needed]

The problem with affiliate marketing, like many other home business options, are the so-called gurus and get-rich-quick programs that suggest affiliate marketing can be done fast and with little effort. Odds are you've read claims of affiliate marketing programs that say you can make hundreds of thousands of dollars a month doing almost nothing ("Three clicks to rich!"). Or, they suggest you can set up your affiliate site, and then forget it, except to check your bank deposits.
Your first step is actually to go to your own site to get an idea of what types of people tend to visit your site and read your content. For example at Quick Sprout, we obviously have a lot of entrepreneurs, a lot of small business owners, a lot of bloggers, a lot of social media professionals that tend to visit Quick Sprout most often. It’s just a good idea to go to your site and just think of the type of people that visit it, because that’s going to guide you when choosing your Clickbank products. Once you’ve done that, your next step is to create a simple but effective spreadsheet just to keep track of all the products that you’ll be looking at.
Always make affiliate links nofollow. Google’s goal is to provide its users with the best possible search results to their search queries. One of the main ways they figure out which webpages are the best is through links. The Google bots crawl the web, reading text. When they come to a link, it’s like an open door. They follow the link (walk through the door) and explore the site you linked to.
In 1994, Tobin launched a beta version of PC Flowers & Gifts on the Internet in cooperation with IBM, who owned half of Prodigy.[6] By 1995 PC Flowers & Gifts had launched a commercial version of the website and had 2,600 affiliate marketing partners on the World Wide Web. Tobin applied for a patent on tracking and affiliate marketing on January 22, 1996, and was issued U.S. Patent number 6,141,666 on Oct 31, 2000. Tobin also received Japanese Patent number 4021941 on Oct 5, 2007, and U.S. Patent number 7,505,913 on Mar 17, 2009, for affiliate marketing and tracking.[7] In July 1998 PC Flowers and Gifts merged with Fingerhut and Federated Department Stores.[8]
Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[35] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks.
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