No. Once you pass your test, and receive your certificate, you are certified for life. For instance if do great on your exam, and thereby get your SEO Certification, get Web Analytics Certified or a Social Media Marketing Certification, then you have it, and we will not ask you to give it back to us, or remove it from your LinkedIn profile, CV or resume. Once you pass the test, the certification is yours to keep.

Epic post! I've been hunting around various sites like Pat Flynn's and others, but they never put everything together as you have. Now it starting to make sense for once. So, I'm a newbie and don't even know the different between internet marketer and digital marketer or what this type of business is even called. I just want to learn this business and create a small passive income online in any niche. Because I know very little, I was actually planning to use this very same Sales Funnel in your diagram and all the tools mentioned to make my first couple of bucks online.
What kind of commission do they offer? One-time commissions or recurring commissions? For example, many programs pay you one time for sending a customer. On the other hand, some programs like membership sites or SaaS (software as a service) programs will pay you a commission as long as the person you referred is a paying customer. Recurring commissions are great when you can find them!
That way, if you decide to write a review to promote it or send the affiliate link for the product's sales page to your email list, etc., you will have first-hand knowledge of how it works. This will help you to decide it the product has real value pertaining to your niche. I, personally, won't sell anything I haven't tried myself to be sure they work as advertised. Selling just to make money with no real value is a sure way to lose customers and ultimately destroy your business. Bad reputations are hard to get rid of once you get one, especially when there's money involved. With that being said, I hope you all have a great holiday season.
If you are building a site that has the potential for information that will never age and remain useful for your audience, you have the opportunity to create what is known as evergreen content. It's important to carry out extensive keyword research before planning any evergreen content for a site like this, as your site could hugely benefit from the proper usage of keywords within such content. 
Instead of building from the ground up, many networks are leveraging technology that already exists, then building on top of it to customize their systems. We see this all the time with HasOffers. For example, Kiip, a mobile advertising network with powerhouse clients like McDonald’s, Coca-Cola, Johnson & Johnson, Wrigley, Pepsi, and BMW, decided to build on top of HasOffers instead of starting from scratch. “After sitting down with the HasOffers team, it quickly became clear that we could rely on something that was already built and allow our engineers to focus on developing our secret sauce,” said Corrigan Neralich, Senior Director of Advertising Operations.
As for Jason Moore, he was already earning some income with affiliate marketing, but with 1·2·3 Affiliate Marketing, he found that he could do so much better. Jason has benefited from some of the in-depth exercises that are in the course, implementing them already within in his own affiliate marketing efforts and seeing great results! Watch Jason's full video below to hear how 1·2·3 Affiliate Marketing has boosted his business.
Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[35] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks. 
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