Cookie stuffing involves placing an affiliate tracking cookie on a website visitor's computer without their knowledge, which will then generate revenue for the person doing the cookie stuffing. This not only generates fraudulent affiliate sales but also has the potential to overwrite other affiliates' cookies, essentially stealing their legitimately earned commissions.
My situation is I'm a Professor and Program Director for a Community College teaching massage therapy, a very in-demand field yet my college does little marketing. It's my job to recruit students. I have a Facebook page and Twitter, and about 100+ followers on each. Can you see this type of system with funnels etc. working to help recruit potential students? If so, how? I feel like building content and creating opt ins should help, as we too are offering a "product". Thanks for your time!
Geno Prussakov of AM Navigator said: “In 2018, we will see significantly higher numbers of affiliate marketing programs run in truly smart ways. Their output will be increased through (i) continuous diversification of affiliate base (by now Google has done a great job teaching everyone “not to put all eggs in one basket”), (ii) extensive use of available technologies (for better attribution, wider reach, shrewder decisions), and (iii) lessons learned from deep(er) analysis of what’s really going on in the program (from the value that different types of affiliates bring throughout customer journey to lifetime customer value of affiliate-referred conversions).”

Just like to add 1 additional "CON" to the list of Pros and Cons of Clickbank. Their rule on paying out the commissions earned. You must have 5 sales all from different credit card accounts before they will pay you what you have earned. That flat out sucks!. Affiliates work hard to get even 1 sale and because of Clickbanks rule, lose that money over time if they cannot get another 4 sales, the commission keeps reducing steadily if 4 more sales are not forthcoming. Clickbank has got to change that rule, which many feel is illegal!. A sale, is a sale, and the commission must be paid out. Basically, Clickbank is "Ripping-Off" affiliate marketers.
Affiliate marketing is an area that even the most seasoned bloggers can improve upon. Plus, most bloggers aren't making anywhere near the amount of affiliate income that they should be and are leaving money on the table. If you want to grow your affiliate income, there are numerous tips and strategies that I share in Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing.
This is the standard affiliate marketing structure. In this program, the merchant pays the affiliate a percentage of the sale price of the product after the consumer purchases the product as a result of the affiliate’s marketing strategies. In other words, the affiliate must actually get the investor to invest in the product before they are compensated.
Two-tier programs exist in the minority of affiliate programs; most are simply one-tier. Referral programs beyond two-tier resemble multi-level marketing (MLM) or network marketing but are different: Multi-level marketing (MLM) or network marketing associations tend to have more complex commission requirements/qualifications than standard affiliate programs.[citation needed]

Although it differs from spyware, adware often uses the same methods and technologies. Merchants initially were uninformed about adware, what impact it had, and how it could damage their brands. Affiliate marketers became aware of the issue much more quickly, especially because they noticed that adware often overwrites tracking cookies, thus resulting in a decline of commissions. Affiliates not employing adware felt that it was stealing commission from them. Adware often has no valuable purpose and rarely provides any useful content to the user, who is typically unaware that such software is installed on his/her computer.
One of the most sought after and highly recommended course is this one on Guide to Effective Affiliate Marketing Strategies by Kudus Adu. Not only does he focus on create an affiliate marketing strategy, he focuses on best practices to create money pages, tells you how to build your email marketing list and how to profit from it. He clearly asks people looking for ‘get rich quick strategies’ to stay away from the course. More details here.
2nd tier.  If you are an affiliate for a particular program and you refer others to sign up for that affiliate program, a 2nd tier program will pay you when the affiliates you referred make sales. For example, I am an affiliate for Ultimate Bundles. If you join their affiliate program via my 2nd tier affiliate link here. I will get a small percentage of any sales you make going forward.
I'm just starting at Clickbank, so I'm a total newbie, but if I want to follow this strategy can I do it promoting just one product, for example, Category>Health & Fitness ---> X product. Then, should i start a blog or something like that where i can talk about things related to the product subject? if so, do i have to start making entries about this recurrently? or I can opt for just making an article with a free ebook in exchange to user's e-mails and follow the process?
#2 High Priced.  Another downside is that the course does cost more, a lot more.  At $997 it does sound like a lot but I prefer not to look at the cost as a burden but rather an investment in my future.  The way I see it if this teaches me how to how to build even a modest income of a $1000 per month for the rest of my life I feel the price is well worth it.
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