Affiliates work to introduce their visitors to the merchant’s brand. They might write a post about a new product or promotion on the merchant’s site, feature banner ads on their site that drive people to the merchant’s site, or offer visitors a special coupon code. If people come from that affiliate’s site and make a purchase, that affiliate gets paid.
Once you have traffic, you need to "make money" from this traffic. This is the fun part. Without spending a dime, you can promote all the top brands in the world through affiliate programs. As a WA member, you'll learn how you can choose from close to 600 MILLION products/services and easily promote them on your website. No inventory. No shipping. No support required.
Alex Genadinik has taught over 100,000 students online, is a 3 time best selling Amazon author and host of a popular business channel on YouTube. Through this course, he wants to teach you strategies for generating residual passive income by setting up your home business. He will also teach you how to find profitable niches and products on Amazon, Clickbank and other platforms.

The easiest and most common way to start building an audience for a website is via social media. Depending on your niche and industry, you can choose from Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and several other niche and location-specific networks. Building up an engaged and interested following on social media is a great opportunity to build relationships and once you have their trust, promote your products and services to them. 
Because of this drop in income, I have been forced to try out other methods and systems. recently I wrote a blog post promoting a clickbank product, then sent out a link to the blog post via email. Just cold - sent it out telling people to have a look at the post. I made over a hundred dollars from one email, in a single day. I have since been convinced that email really is the way forward. Imagine if I had spent the last year focused on collecting emails rather than getting adsense clicks!!!!
I am absolutely new to the whole online marketing thing. I visited CB in 2012, then, it appeared overwhelming so I put it on the back burner. A week ago I revisited CB and ran two campaigns without a website nor blog . I went to Fiverr and had traffic directed to my CB ad. At this point, I'm just waiting to see if anything converts. I jumped in without knowing too much of what I was doing... I needed to take some type of action.
Next, I’m going to walk you through the information that’s in this box, because this is a lot of information in this little box and it can get overwhelming if you don’t know what all these terms mean. The first thing you want to pay attention to is the average amount of money per sale. This is not how much the product costs; this is how much an affiliate makes on average for one sale of that product. When you look at the stats line, this basically drills that down into a little bit more detail. The initial sale is $20.65. Why does this go all the way up to $26.80? That’s because there’s a re-bill feature. What that is, is basically they buy the product, and then there’s an add-on or another option for that person to sign up to some membership site, and that’s how much they make on average from the re-bill. If you average everything together, this is how much the affiliate makes with everything considered.
Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[35] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks.
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