Mistake #2: Using the “They must not be my people” excuse to be spammy. I’m not a fan of this common tactic. Here’s how it works: people send a huge number of sales/promotional emails to their list with no warning and with no easy way to opt out. When people complain or unsubscribe, they put it on them (“Oh well, they aren’t my type of subscriber anyway…”), instead of taking responsibility for the spam (let’s call it what it is). What ever happened to “treat others the way you want to be treated”?

Totally awesome Gael. Thank you so much for sharing. Yes, the per-engagement presell sequence strategy is the way to go in 2015 - pulling folk in with front end value content building that all important relationship factor and enticing them to opt in for more..., then offering them a solution at a lower price as it's the first offer on TY page...and then promoting the opt in throughout your posts starting out with the problem, then turning it into finding the solution (as you have done above, lol!), plus Outbrain to LINK relative content, AND get affiliates on board + repeat with many blog posts and many offers, specially ads via FB and Pinterest Pin posts - man this is a powerful win-win. Makes SO much sense to me - am doing this right from NOW...Will be following your CB success and I'll report back mine... R.


The problem with affiliate marketing, like many other home business options, are the so-called gurus and get-rich-quick programs that suggest affiliate marketing can be done fast and with little effort. Odds are you've read claims of affiliate marketing programs that say you can make hundreds of thousands of dollars a month doing almost nothing ("Three clicks to rich!"). Or, they suggest you can set up your affiliate site, and then forget it, except to check your bank deposits.


The topic you choose must have enough depth that you can create a lot of content for it. This is important for building an authoritative site, for search engine optimization, and most importantly, for the end user. If you don't have enough content about a topic, you're not going to be taken very seriously as an authority on the topic and it's unlikely you can convince someone to make a purchase from you. 

No matter how good your marketing skills are, you’ll make less money on a bad product than you will on a valuable one. Take the time to study the demand for a product before promoting it. Make sure to research the seller with care before teaming up. Your time is worth a lot, and you want to be sure you’re spending it on a product that is profitable and a seller you can believe in.
Merchants or advertisers are those who have a product to sell. They are interested in increasing their profit by working with affiliates and allowing them to promote the product on their behalf. Merchants do so by using an affiliate program where they provide everything needed for the promotion of the product(s) including the affiliate links. The course represents a guide for merchants to create an affiliate program and a strategy to encourage affiliates to join.
After being accepted into an affiliate program, marketers receive a unique URL that includes their affiliate ID. They share that unique URL with their subscribers, site visitors, and social networks via text links or ads. When someone clicks on that link, affiliate software records that click and any resulting product sales in the affiliate’s account. When commissions reach a pre-determined threshold, the affiliate is paid.
×