In the case of cost per mille/click, the publisher is not concerned about whether a visitor is a member of the audience that the advertiser tries to attract and is able to convert, because at this point the publisher has already earned his commission. This leaves the greater, and, in case of cost per mille, the full risk and loss (if the visitor cannot be converted) to the advertiser.
"I started my blog in March 2015 and didn't even know what affiliate marketing meant. And....I didn't do much about it. I think my largest month was around $500 last year and then died down to sometimes only a few bucks per month. It wasn't my focus, but I didn't realize I was leaving money on the table, meaning I was losing money every month! I decided to enroll in Michelle's course, and I quickly noticed I didn't know a thing when it came to true Affiliate Marketing! No wonder it just 'wasn't working for me'...
I am absolutely new to the whole online marketing thing. I visited CB in 2012, then, it appeared overwhelming so I put it on the back burner. A week ago I revisited CB and ran two campaigns without a website nor blog . I went to Fiverr and had traffic directed to my CB ad. At this point, I'm just waiting to see if anything converts. I jumped in without knowing too much of what I was doing... I needed to take some type of action.
Outbrain is not necessarily the network of choice, it was just an example. As for tracking the ROI usually you'll want to track campaigns in Google analytics and track clicks on affiliate links as event and average value/email or you'll want to duplicate the post and run paid traffic to the duplicate so you know exactly what the conversions are as you can put them in separate email lists etc too.

I have been making money online for over a year now. Not in the big time yet, still consider myself to be learning my craft. I was doing it really ineffectively (using adsense and amazon along with a t shirt affiliate deal) and driving traffic almost exclusively though facebook. Probably averaged about $800 a month over the last year, mostly because Christmas brought an absolute ton of t shirt sales)

Just like to add 1 additional "CON" to the list of Pros and Cons of Clickbank. Their rule on paying out the commissions earned. You must have 5 sales all from different credit card accounts before they will pay you what you have earned. That flat out sucks!. Affiliates work hard to get even 1 sale and because of Clickbanks rule, lose that money over time if they cannot get another 4 sales, the commission keeps reducing steadily if 4 more sales are not forthcoming. Clickbank has got to change that rule, which many feel is illegal!. A sale, is a sale, and the commission must be paid out. Basically, Clickbank is "Ripping-Off" affiliate marketers.


"I have to tell you, I took the course and have implemented her strategies and am already seeing results. There are some courses I have taken and have wondered what I learned after I took it. That is not the case with this course. This is one of those courses you won’t regret taking. Michelle knows what she is talking about when it comes to affiliate marketing and she has results to prove it. She brings in over $50,000 a month in affiliate income alone. And now she is teaching us how we can do the same thing." - Crystal, Blogger, HappilyEverUncluttered.com
Now most affiliate programs have strict terms and conditions on how the lead is to be generated. There are also certain methods that are outright banned, such as installing adware or spyware that redirect all search queries for a product to an affiliate's page. Some affiliate marketing programs go as far as to lay out how a product or service is to be discussed in the content before an affiliate link can be validated.

What are the terms of the program? Is there anything I need to be aware of that would make a program not worth it for me. For example, Amazon Associates does not allow you to put your affiliate links in emails. If your main method of communication with your audience is via email, Amazon might not be a good fit for you. Wayfair, for example, does not allow their affiliates to post affiliate links on Pinterest or any other social media site. If that’s a strategy you rely on, Wayfair might not be a good fit for you.


Affiliate marketing is an area that even the most seasoned bloggers can improve upon. Plus, most bloggers aren't making anywhere near the amount of affiliate income that they should be and are leaving money on the table. If you want to grow your affiliate income, there are numerous tips and strategies that I share in Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing.
Websites consisting mostly of affiliate links have previously held a negative reputation for underdelivering quality content. In 2005 there were active changes made by Google, where certain websites were labeled as "thin affiliates".[30] Such websites were either removed from Google's index or were relocated within the results page (i.e., moved from the top-most results to a lower position). To avoid this categorization, affiliate marketer webmasters must create quality content on their websites that distinguishes their work from the work of spammers or banner farms, which only contain links leading to merchant sites.
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