MY biggest struggle is knowing how to put the promotion together and having everything in place when you promote it. I would kill for a Step-by-Step hold your hand and let me show you once how to do it correctly Mapped Blueprint. I have seen lots of sales pages but when you get them from the vendor they look a lot of the times nothing like the Org sales page, have never written a sales page before and it becomes overwhelming and confusing and then totally frustrating
Hey Arthur, glad you like the site! I don't think bloggers would be against giving free stuff instead of asking money for it. Squeeze pages work fine. But I'd still recommend you build your own site and own platform, its just better in the long run. The way you do it is you create a free post (like this one) with free downloads inside then drive traffic to it. Everyone is happy to link to free info then you can retarget people without too much trouble.

Know when to wait. Some affiliate programs require a certain level of traffic, subscribers, etc. If that’s the case, I say it’s better to wait to apply for that program instead of applying and hoping for the best. You risk being labelled the person who can’t follow guidelines and you might also risk not be allowed into the program when you do meet the qualifications.


I personally prefer to do it that way--you can create a more convincing review that's more likely to make sales. It's not always possible or practical, though; for example, would you break up with your significant other just to test a product for getting your ex back? ;-) In cases like that, or if the product is expensive, it's usually best just to use the vendor's affiliate resources instead.
Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[35] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks.
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