I got a question about the funnel. You were talking about the first page to be a blog page. I interpreted it as having you own blog(website), that should compete with other expert website. I was wondering if the first step of your funnel can be the opt-in page. The blogs that refers to the opt-in page are guestblogposts on expert websites, so multiple ways of traffic and seo. So you are only building an opt-in page, thank you page, landing pages etc on your website, but no blog to become an expert. Is that something you can do? Or is that not Google friendly or most expert websites are against?
Some commentators originally suggested that affiliate links work best in the context of the information contained within the website itself. For instance, if a website contains information pertaining to publishing a website, an affiliate link leading to a merchant's internet service provider (ISP) within that website's content would be appropriate. If a website contains information pertaining to sports, an affiliate link leading to a sporting goods website may work well within the context of the articles and information about sports. The goal, in this case, is to publish quality information on the website and provide context-oriented links to related merchant's websites.
Outbrain is not necessarily the network of choice, it was just an example. As for tracking the ROI usually you'll want to track campaigns in Google analytics and track clicks on affiliate links as event and average value/email or you'll want to duplicate the post and run paid traffic to the duplicate so you know exactly what the conversions are as you can put them in separate email lists etc too.
One last note. I’ve been asked what I think of other affiliate marketing resources, both free and paid. I’m familiar with some of them, not all. I’ve read ebooks, watch videos, bought courses and more. So far, the only paid-for course that has impressed me enough to recommend is Kayla Aimee’s Affiliate Acceleration: Impactful Strategies To Increase Your Passive Income.
The trainers Phil Ebiner and Diego Davila are very proficient when it comes to all things digital marketing. Having taught 600,000+ students on a variety of subjects till date, they are more experienced than you can believe. Affiliate marketing is incomplete without in depth knowledge of digital marketing and that is exactly what this course wishes to fulfill in 32.5 hours of intense training. You will learn about platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest in addition to finding more about Email Marketing, Quora, Google Adwords and much more.
Over the past two years, I have been nothing but overwhelmed with internet and affiliate marketing. I think I am like many beginning internet marketers. Try every tool and every internet marketing guru's advice because they promise the world and make it seem so easy. Cost? Huge. Results? Few. When I came across Pat Flynn I felt there was something different. He just seemed real to me. So, I decided to try Pat's 1·2·3 Affiliate Marketing course. His course was much less expensive than others I've paid for. I'm half-way through the course and I finally finished my site and made a sale. I have regained my faith and really enjoy the white hat aspect of affiliate marketing. I feel like Pat really cares about us, which is unique in this business.

Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[35] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks.
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