Developing and monetizing microsites can also garner a serious amount of sales. These sites are advertised within a partner site or on the sponsored listings of a search engine. They are distinct and separate from the organization’s main site. By offering more focused, relevant content to a specific audience, microsites lead to increased conversions due to their simple and straightforward call to action.
I, too, have always looked at ClickBank as a secondary and even tertiary monetization source. But it can be a great sources of revenue. I linked one of my articles to a related product on CB, and without really doing promotion or anything unusual, I get a few sales a week. Mind you, the keyword(s) for the post aren't that huge either. So, even though the traffic not huge on that post, it still manages to get some sales.
Affiliates work to introduce their visitors to the merchant’s brand. They might write a post about a new product or promotion on the merchant’s site, feature banner ads on their site that drive people to the merchant’s site, or offer visitors a special coupon code. If people come from that affiliate’s site and make a purchase, that affiliate gets paid.

Kevin Edwards, Global Client Strategy Director of AWIN, put it this way: “Data will continue to underpin the channel’s success. When one of the world’s most important marketers bemoans the state of digital marketing as opaque and lacking transparency, it sends a clear signal about the opportunity for affiliate marketing. P&G’s chief marketing officer made that statement earlier in 2017 and it should be a lightbulb moment for us about positioning the channel as the foremost, results-driven opportunity available to digital marketers. This can only be achieved if we get better at sharing significantly more data to facilitate a more three-dimensional and qualitative view of affiliate marketing beyond last click. Lifetime value holds the key to building a more rounded view of the power of affiliates to deliver quality customers.”
Hey Arthur, glad you like the site! I don't think bloggers would be against giving free stuff instead of asking money for it. Squeeze pages work fine. But I'd still recommend you build your own site and own platform, its just better in the long run. The way you do it is you create a free post (like this one) with free downloads inside then drive traffic to it. Everyone is happy to link to free info then you can retarget people without too much trouble.
"I have to tell you, I took the course and have implemented her strategies and am already seeing results. There are some courses I have taken and have wondered what I learned after I took it. That is not the case with this course. This is one of those courses you won’t regret taking. Michelle knows what she is talking about when it comes to affiliate marketing and she has results to prove it. She brings in over $50,000 a month in affiliate income alone. And now she is teaching us how we can do the same thing." - Crystal, Blogger, HappilyEverUncluttered.com

#1  Full of Valuable Advice, Tips, and Strategies.  One of my favorite parts of the course is all the tips and strategies Michelle gives.  Her tips on creating tutorials to make more sales to the Pinterest strategy she uses are solid and powerful.  A lot of times I will review her course an take just one idea and implement it. When it comes down to it this is not one of those courses that you go through once but rather one that you will revisit over and over.
Mistake #2: Using the “They must not be my people” excuse to be spammy. I’m not a fan of this common tactic. Here’s how it works: people send a huge number of sales/promotional emails to their list with no warning and with no easy way to opt out. When people complain or unsubscribe, they put it on them (“Oh well, they aren’t my type of subscriber anyway…”), instead of taking responsibility for the spam (let’s call it what it is). What ever happened to “treat others the way you want to be treated”?
I have developed what I think is a pretty cool 11-part auto responder series that solves a critical problem people have in my niche - it includes a number of affiliate links as well (although not clickbank - yet). I currently have a squeeze page set up which I'm driving traffic to through using FB ads, but I'm finding that I'm having to pay way too much for every conversion ( > $1.50 per conversion).
The next thing you want to take a look at is the bottom of the page. At the bottom of almost every page for Clickbank products, whether it’s a video sales letter like this or more of a text-based sales letter like this, there’s usually a little affiliates link. Basically, that’s a link to a number of affiliate resources that help you promote the product. You want to look for that, and then click on the link if it’s there. You want to take a look at basically what they offer you; so whether it is some banners to help you out, whether it’s a dedicated affiliate manager. If they make you sign up, you usually don’t have to do that. They usually have this ‘Already a member? Click here’, and you can just click on that and get access to the resources right away. In some cases, they have contest like this, and a lot of times they actually offer you a lot of things that can help you, like swipes and banners. Just look for things like banners, or creatives as they’re often called, and just take a look at them and see if they would be a good fit for your site. If not, no big deal; you can always go to Fiverr and get a banner made pretty cheaply. In general, I’ve found the more stuff that they give you to help you promote their product, the better, especially because when you’re first stating out, you don’t really know whether or not this is going to go well. It helps if they give you a quick banner that you can just throw up on your site to test the waters and see how well it converts on your site. If you see that they give you a lot of support in terms of creatives, then that’s a good sign that they’re going to be helpful when you actually sign up as an affiliate. Even if you don’t see a lot of banners, it’s not a deal-breaker; it’s just something that helps make the process of promoting that product a bit easier.

The Ultimate Affiliate Marketing Guide-has recently released there affiliate marketing guide, and it’s available for download on Amazon as a Kindle edition and on our website in PDF format. This ultimate ebook consists of over 60 pages of insightful knowledge about affiliate marketing, industry news, actionable affiliate techniques and answers to crucial performance marketing related questions.


If you like the sound of affiliate marketing as a business model, the course also provides information on setting up your own affiliate marketing business – becoming the middle-man. From the course, you’ll learn how to manage the day-to-day operations of the business, be exposed to some useful business management tools and resources, and gain an understanding of how affiliate marketing businesses are taxed in the UK.

Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[35] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks.
×