Affiliate marketing is an area that even the most seasoned bloggers can improve upon. Plus, most bloggers aren't making anywhere near the amount of affiliate income that they should be and are leaving money on the table. If you want to grow your affiliate income, there are numerous tips and strategies that I share in Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing.
Once you’ve landed on the Marketplace and you have your spreadsheet setup, your next step is to take a look at the categories in the left-hand sidebar. For a site like Quick Sprout, it’s pretty straightforward: Business, investing, computers, internet, e-business, and e-marketing. Those are categories that would fit well with the audience at Quick Sprout. Depending on what your site is, you may have a category too that really jumps out at you. You don’t just want to stop at the categories that fit best, you want to look at other categories that might be in line with something else your target audience wants. Sometimes, you can find your best products using that. You definitely want to start with the categories that seem to make the most sense.

Both merchants and affiliates need a plan on how to implement affiliate marketing in their online presence, how to develop a strategy to increase performance, as well as to explore benefits they can achieve with this kind of promotion. Each of these concepts is covered in this course. Management of an affiliate program is a chapter dedicated to merchants with tips on how to monitor the program and successfully communicate with the affiliates. Suggestions on popular affiliate programs to join is a chapter for affiliates where they can find interesting affiliate programs, alongside some of the most important features for each of them.
What we’re going to look at is one category here, e-business and e-marketing. When you click on that category, Clickbank automatically sorts the results by popularity. Popularity is basically how many sales that product is getting. As an affiliate, you definitely want to sort the results by gravity. Click on this little dropdown menu and choose Gravity. Gravity is complicated, but it’s basically how many different affiliates are making sales from that product. That’s important for you as an affiliate, because the more different people are making money from that product, that really shows that it’s a proven winner.
Spam is the biggest threat to organic search engines, whose goal is to provide quality search results for keywords or phrases entered by their users. Google's PageRank algorithm update ("BigDaddy") in February 2006—the final stage of Google's major update ("Jagger") that began in mid-summer 2005—specifically targeted spamdexing with great success. This update thus enabled Google to remove a large amount of mostly computer-generated duplicate content from its index.[29]

people who visited the site but did not opt in > you can use negative audiences for your ads with facebook ads, you just take visitors to the site and substract the people that visited the thank you page. For people who did not purchase, you simply can't with affiliate marketing unless the vendor adds a conversion pixel of yours on their thank you page.

Totally awesome Gael. Thank you so much for sharing. Yes, the per-engagement presell sequence strategy is the way to go in 2015 - pulling folk in with front end value content building that all important relationship factor and enticing them to opt in for more..., then offering them a solution at a lower price as it's the first offer on TY page...and then promoting the opt in throughout your posts starting out with the problem, then turning it into finding the solution (as you have done above, lol!), plus Outbrain to LINK relative content, AND get affiliates on board + repeat with many blog posts and many offers, specially ads via FB and Pinterest Pin posts - man this is a powerful win-win. Makes SO much sense to me - am doing this right from NOW...Will be following your CB success and I'll report back mine... R.
Affiliate marketing is an area that even the most seasoned bloggers can improve upon. Plus, most bloggers aren't making anywhere near the amount of affiliate income that they should be and are leaving money on the table. If you want to grow your affiliate income, there are numerous tips and strategies that I share in Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing.

Kevin Edwards, Global Client Strategy Director of AWIN, put it this way: “Data will continue to underpin the channel’s success. When one of the world’s most important marketers bemoans the state of digital marketing as opaque and lacking transparency, it sends a clear signal about the opportunity for affiliate marketing. P&G’s chief marketing officer made that statement earlier in 2017 and it should be a lightbulb moment for us about positioning the channel as the foremost, results-driven opportunity available to digital marketers. This can only be achieved if we get better at sharing significantly more data to facilitate a more three-dimensional and qualitative view of affiliate marketing beyond last click. Lifetime value holds the key to building a more rounded view of the power of affiliates to deliver quality customers.”


Tip: Aim for products with reasonable commission. No lower than let’s say 40 percent, to make your efforts worthwhile. Also, you should note that ClickBank deducts transaction fees from a sale. Here’s a calculator to help you calculate your actual commission. More so, you need to remember to disclose all your affiliate links and mark them as nofollow. Here are a few reasons as to why you need to do this.

Just like to add 1 additional "CON" to the list of Pros and Cons of Clickbank. Their rule on paying out the commissions earned. You must have 5 sales all from different credit card accounts before they will pay you what you have earned. That flat out sucks!. Affiliates work hard to get even 1 sale and because of Clickbanks rule, lose that money over time if they cannot get another 4 sales, the commission keeps reducing steadily if 4 more sales are not forthcoming. Clickbank has got to change that rule, which many feel is illegal!. A sale, is a sale, and the commission must be paid out. Basically, Clickbank is "Ripping-Off" affiliate marketers.
Once your hosting is set up, you need to install a content management system (CMS) for your site. We recommend WordPress because it is easy to use and a beginner (like you!) can quite quickly figure out how it works. Most good hosting providers will have a one-click install option for WordPress, which means it will only take you a couple of minutes and you will have WordPress installed on your site. 
The terms of an affiliate marketing program are set by the company wanting to advertise. Early on, companies were largely paying cost per click (traffic) or cost per mile (impressions) on banner advertisements. As the technology evolved, the focus turned to commissions on actual sales or qualified leads. The early affiliate marketing programs were vulnerable to fraud because clicks could be generated by software, as could impressions.
Thanks! I have a few products mixed into my blog posts, and will be adding more. I have found CB to be a mixed bag so far - but need more time to see how it pans out. Also wondering about setting up more sites to follow the funnel you set up. I was pleased to hear you mention having 3 follow ups in the responder sequence. Someone else had suggested 10! I figured by 4 or 5 you lost them anyway.

This adds, even more, value to the course. I want to help you with your blog so that you can increase traffic, your income, and so that you can help your followers, so what's better than this? Two Saturdays a month, there will be a group coaching session in the private Mastermind group for students in the course. It will be called "Ask Michelle Saturday." This is your time to get feedback and support from me, and you can ask any questions related to your business, course material, your affiliate strategy, blog, and so on. I will answer every question in the group coaching session.
Next, I’m going to walk you through the information that’s in this box, because this is a lot of information in this little box and it can get overwhelming if you don’t know what all these terms mean. The first thing you want to pay attention to is the average amount of money per sale. This is not how much the product costs; this is how much an affiliate makes on average for one sale of that product. When you look at the stats line, this basically drills that down into a little bit more detail. The initial sale is $20.65. Why does this go all the way up to $26.80? That’s because there’s a re-bill feature. What that is, is basically they buy the product, and then there’s an add-on or another option for that person to sign up to some membership site, and that’s how much they make on average from the re-bill. If you average everything together, this is how much the affiliate makes with everything considered.
I got a question about the funnel. You were talking about the first page to be a blog page. I interpreted it as having you own blog(website), that should compete with other expert website. I was wondering if the first step of your funnel can be the opt-in page. The blogs that refers to the opt-in page are guestblogposts on expert websites, so multiple ways of traffic and seo. So you are only building an opt-in page, thank you page, landing pages etc on your website, but no blog to become an expert. Is that something you can do? Or is that not Google friendly or most expert websites are against?
As search engines have become more prominent, some affiliate marketers have shifted from sending e-mail spam to creating automatically generated web pages that often contain product data feeds provided by merchants. The goal of such web pages is to manipulate the relevancy or prominence of resources indexed by a search engine, also known as spamdexing. Each page can be targeted to a different niche market through the use of specific keywords, with the result being a skewed form of search engine optimization.
Cookie stuffing involves placing an affiliate tracking cookie on a website visitor's computer without their knowledge, which will then generate revenue for the person doing the cookie stuffing. This not only generates fraudulent affiliate sales but also has the potential to overwrite other affiliates' cookies, essentially stealing their legitimately earned commissions.
After being accepted into an affiliate program, marketers receive a unique URL that includes their affiliate ID. They share that unique URL with their subscribers, site visitors, and social networks via text links or ads. When someone clicks on that link, affiliate software records that click and any resulting product sales in the affiliate’s account. When commissions reach a pre-determined threshold, the affiliate is paid.
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