Affiliate marketing is often seen as a quick-win that requires very little effort, but when affiliates and merchants treat it as such they rarely reap the rewards. This course unlocks the secrets to success – divulging how to invest your efforts effectively, to cultivate the best possible return. You’ll learn to recognise and encourage your most profitable campaigns (as an affiliate publisher) and identify and nurture your best-performing affiliates (as a merchant).
4. Zero Entitlement – This has been the death of many potentially successful marketers on the internet. Affiliate marketing is no get rich quick scheme — it’s a business that requires dedication, effort and hard work. If you feel entitled to earn money because you placed a few ads or you followed a guide and are expecting instant or guaranteed returns, you will be killed! Failure is just a lesson learnt and a step closer to success.
Outbrain is not necessarily the network of choice, it was just an example. As for tracking the ROI usually you'll want to track campaigns in Google analytics and track clicks on affiliate links as event and average value/email or you'll want to duplicate the post and run paid traffic to the duplicate so you know exactly what the conversions are as you can put them in separate email lists etc too.

people who visited the site but did not opt in > you can use negative audiences for your ads with facebook ads, you just take visitors to the site and substract the people that visited the thank you page. For people who did not purchase, you simply can't with affiliate marketing unless the vendor adds a conversion pixel of yours on their thank you page.


The average percentage per sale is the average commission that you make. In this case, for every sale that they make, you get half, and it’s the same story with the average percentage of re-bill. No matter what; when you sell, you get 50%. Typically, the average percentage for a sale and the average percentage for a re-bill are exactly the same. The Gravity, again, is basically how many different affiliates are making sales, in this case over 300, which is very good.
After being accepted into an affiliate program, marketers receive a unique URL that includes their affiliate ID. They share that unique URL with their subscribers, site visitors, and social networks via text links or ads. When someone clicks on that link, affiliate software records that click and any resulting product sales in the affiliate’s account. When commissions reach a pre-determined threshold, the affiliate is paid.

The topic you choose must have enough depth that you can create a lot of content for it. This is important for building an authoritative site, for search engine optimization, and most importantly, for the end user. If you don't have enough content about a topic, you're not going to be taken very seriously as an authority on the topic and it's unlikely you can convince someone to make a purchase from you. 
In the last couple of years, several high-profile brands and influencers (Warner Brothers and the Kardashians, to name a few) have come under scrutiny for failing to disclose paid advertisements. Along with this enhanced focus from the FTC comes the new General Protection Data Regulation (GDPR) regulations, ensuring affiliate marketers will be more focused on compliance and transparency than ever before.

I got a question about the funnel. You were talking about the first page to be a blog page. I interpreted it as having you own blog(website), that should compete with other expert website. I was wondering if the first step of your funnel can be the opt-in page. The blogs that refers to the opt-in page are guestblogposts on expert websites, so multiple ways of traffic and seo. So you are only building an opt-in page, thank you page, landing pages etc on your website, but no blog to become an expert. Is that something you can do? Or is that not Google friendly or most expert websites are against?
Next, I’m going to walk you through the information that’s in this box, because this is a lot of information in this little box and it can get overwhelming if you don’t know what all these terms mean. The first thing you want to pay attention to is the average amount of money per sale. This is not how much the product costs; this is how much an affiliate makes on average for one sale of that product. When you look at the stats line, this basically drills that down into a little bit more detail. The initial sale is $20.65. Why does this go all the way up to $26.80? That’s because there’s a re-bill feature. What that is, is basically they buy the product, and then there’s an add-on or another option for that person to sign up to some membership site, and that’s how much they make on average from the re-bill. If you average everything together, this is how much the affiliate makes with everything considered.
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