A quick and inexpensive method of making money without the hassle of actually selling a product, affiliate marketing has an undeniable draw for those looking to increase their income online. But how does an affiliate get paid after linking the seller to the consumer? The answer is complicated. The consumer doesn’t always need to buy the product for the affiliate to get a kickback. Depending on the program, the affiliate’s contribution to the seller’s sales will be measured differently. The affiliate may get paid in various ways:
Hi, Nice article. I am not sure about the process though. I can understand, finding a niche. But, when it comes to affiliate programs I get a little lost. Would I be promoting someone else's products? If so, no problem. I know I need to research high end products with gravity, are these products ones in certain stores, or companies, etc.?? If so, do I need to get permissions to be on an affiliate program with that company? Also, if it is products with a company, then how do I offer promotions on their products since they are not mine? Thank you, Nanette Vlahusich

To those on the outside, affiliate marketing can seem like a black box. It’s inner workings are mysterious to most marketers and in many companies it’s not treated with the same seriousness as other channels. Some marketers, only familiar with the bad reputation acquired by some industry players in the 2000s, deride it as a source of spam and little more.


A quick and inexpensive method of making money without the hassle of actually selling a product, affiliate marketing has an undeniable draw for those looking to increase their income online. But how does an affiliate get paid after linking the seller to the consumer? The answer is complicated. The consumer doesn’t always need to buy the product for the affiliate to get a kickback. Depending on the program, the affiliate’s contribution to the seller’s sales will be measured differently. The affiliate may get paid in various ways:

Will my target audience realistically buy this now, or at a different time? Be sensitive to sales cycles and seasons. Maybe you should avoid holidays (when people are away from their computers, like July 4 in the U.S.) or maybe you should target holidays (like the day after Thanksgiving), but know the difference. Again, know your audience. Plan your content accordingly.

Don’t exhaust all the information about the product with your link. Offer enough information to your readers so they know what the link is, but I don’t recommend giving too much detail on your own site for a two reasons. First, product information, like price, often changes. If you mention the price on your site and someone clicks over and finds a different price, it’s confusing. Second, many times, the product details and features are better explained by the makers of the product. It’s best to stick to your own experience on your site.


Creating blog content is a very useful and effective way of consistently building content on a site. When creating blog posts, it's a good idea to do some keyword research to figure out what it is that your audience is interested in and searching for online. Also, be sure to research competitors, forums and social media to narrow down on topics for your blog. 
"I started my blog in March 2015 and didn't even know what affiliate marketing meant. And....I didn't do much about it. I think my largest month was around $500 last year and then died down to sometimes only a few bucks per month. It wasn't my focus, but I didn't realize I was leaving money on the table, meaning I was losing money every month! I decided to enroll in Michelle's course, and I quickly noticed I didn't know a thing when it came to true Affiliate Marketing! No wonder it just 'wasn't working for me'...
#1 Geared more towards selling on the Amazon Affiliate Program.  One small downside I noticed with this course was that it was geared more towards selling products through the Amazon Affiliate Program.  Don’t get me wrong Amazon’s affiliate program is great but there is so much more out there.  However, all the info in this course can be applied to almost any other affiliate program.
ClickBank is a privately held Internet retailer of both physical and digital products. ClickBank was founded in 1998. The company has more than six-million clients worldwide which secured it in becoming the 87th largest Internet retailer in North America. ClickBank is a subsidiary of Keynetics Inc., one of Idaho’s largest privately held technology companies. The company has headquarters in Boise, Idaho, and offices in Broomfield, Colorado.
The other things you want to pay attention to are these little icons. If you hover over them, they actually explain them. It basically shows the language, whether it’s one-time billing, recurring billing, or both, so if you see both icons it’s both; whether they have a $1 trial, which is a feature that not all products in Clickbank have, whether there is PitchPlus, which is basically an up-sell, and finally, whether or not they have basically a separate HopLink target URL, which is your affiliate link that can bring people to a mobile-optimized page. You can have your regular HopLink which will take people to the general sales page, or if they have this special one, it means they have a link that will go directly to a page that’s designed for mobile devices. This isn’t really crucial unless you have a lot of people that use mobile devices, plus more and more sales pages are responsive, so you don’t really have to worry about this.
Due to the fact we thousands of different business-related templates, we are asking ourselves, if it possible to setup clickbank in such a way it adapts the Clickbank presented content to a keyword we give so that it's matches up with the content on our website. For example, if our page contains a drop shipping agreement template only drop shipping related Clickbank content if presented.
Next, I’m going to walk you through the information that’s in this box, because this is a lot of information in this little box and it can get overwhelming if you don’t know what all these terms mean. The first thing you want to pay attention to is the average amount of money per sale. This is not how much the product costs; this is how much an affiliate makes on average for one sale of that product. When you look at the stats line, this basically drills that down into a little bit more detail. The initial sale is $20.65. Why does this go all the way up to $26.80? That’s because there’s a re-bill feature. What that is, is basically they buy the product, and then there’s an add-on or another option for that person to sign up to some membership site, and that’s how much they make on average from the re-bill. If you average everything together, this is how much the affiliate makes with everything considered.
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