I, too, have always looked at ClickBank as a secondary and even tertiary monetization source. But it can be a great sources of revenue. I linked one of my articles to a related product on CB, and without really doing promotion or anything unusual, I get a few sales a week. Mind you, the keyword(s) for the post aren't that huge either. So, even though the traffic not huge on that post, it still manages to get some sales.
Is this course we're going to explore the world's oldest & largest affiliate marketplace Clickbank. Of all of the affiliate marketplaces there is this is the only true level playing field for every online marketer. No matter if you are brand new to product creation or not you stand an equal chance at making a success online by having your products listed in the Clickbank marketplace.
If you are building a site that has the potential for information that will never age and remain useful for your audience, you have the opportunity to create what is known as evergreen content. It's important to carry out extensive keyword research before planning any evergreen content for a site like this, as your site could hugely benefit from the proper usage of keywords within such content. 
Win-win-win. The advertiser wins because they only pay when a purchase is made (as opposed to the shotgun approach of paying to advertise to the masses and waiting for a small percentage to actually buy). The affiliate wins because they make money while providing helpful advice. The customer wins because they get a trusted recommendation for something they might not otherwise have known about.
Mistake #2: Using the “They must not be my people” excuse to be spammy. I’m not a fan of this common tactic. Here’s how it works: people send a huge number of sales/promotional emails to their list with no warning and with no easy way to opt out. When people complain or unsubscribe, they put it on them (“Oh well, they aren’t my type of subscriber anyway…”), instead of taking responsibility for the spam (let’s call it what it is). What ever happened to “treat others the way you want to be treated”?
Affiliate marketing is also called "performance marketing", in reference to how sales employees are typically being compensated. Such employees are typically paid a commission for each sale they close, and sometimes are paid performance incentives for exceeding objectives.[21] Affiliates are not employed by the advertiser whose products or services they promote, but the compensation models applied to affiliate marketing are very similar to the ones used for people in the advertisers' internal sales department.
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