Next, I’m going to walk you through the information that’s in this box, because this is a lot of information in this little box and it can get overwhelming if you don’t know what all these terms mean. The first thing you want to pay attention to is the average amount of money per sale. This is not how much the product costs; this is how much an affiliate makes on average for one sale of that product. When you look at the stats line, this basically drills that down into a little bit more detail. The initial sale is $20.65. Why does this go all the way up to $26.80? That’s because there’s a re-bill feature. What that is, is basically they buy the product, and then there’s an add-on or another option for that person to sign up to some membership site, and that’s how much they make on average from the re-bill. If you average everything together, this is how much the affiliate makes with everything considered.
After being accepted into an affiliate program, marketers receive a unique URL that includes their affiliate ID. They share that unique URL with their subscribers, site visitors, and social networks via text links or ads. When someone clicks on that link, affiliate software records that click and any resulting product sales in the affiliate’s account. When commissions reach a pre-determined threshold, the affiliate is paid.
As search engines have become more prominent, some affiliate marketers have shifted from sending e-mail spam to creating automatically generated web pages that often contain product data feeds provided by merchants. The goal of such web pages is to manipulate the relevancy or prominence of resources indexed by a search engine, also known as spamdexing. Each page can be targeted to a different niche market through the use of specific keywords, with the result being a skewed form of search engine optimization.
Over the past two years, I have been nothing but overwhelmed with internet and affiliate marketing. I think I am like many beginning internet marketers. Try every tool and every internet marketing guru's advice because they promise the world and make it seem so easy. Cost? Huge. Results? Few. When I came across Pat Flynn I felt there was something different. He just seemed real to me. So, I decided to try Pat's 1·2·3 Affiliate Marketing course. His course was much less expensive than others I've paid for. I'm half-way through the course and I finally finished my site and made a sale. I have regained my faith and really enjoy the white hat aspect of affiliate marketing. I feel like Pat really cares about us, which is unique in this business.
The best way to think about affiliate marketing is quality over quantity. There are a lot of small websites that will promote your product, but the key is finding a small number of partners that will deliver conversions. For example, an equity management services firm has over 20,000 affiliates in its system, but only about 25 affiliates generate 85 percent of revenue.
Clickbank, huh... now that's a name I haven't heard in a while! I remember messing around with them back in 2011 when I was a newbie. Never did make any money with them, haha, but I've seen plenty of people who have! I've just never been any good at pushing the weight loss stuff, which I'm pretty sure is where most people make their money with Clickbank.
After being accepted into an affiliate program, marketers receive a unique URL that includes their affiliate ID. They share that unique URL with their subscribers, site visitors, and social networks via text links or ads. When someone clicks on that link, affiliate software records that click and any resulting product sales in the affiliate’s account. When commissions reach a pre-determined threshold, the affiliate is paid.
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