Cost per action/sale methods require that referred visitors do more than visit the advertiser's website before the affiliate receives a commission. The advertiser must convert that visitor first. It is in the best interest of the affiliate to send the most closely targeted traffic to the advertiser as possible to increase the chance of a conversion. The risk and loss are shared between the affiliate and the advertiser.
Totally awesome Gael. Thank you so much for sharing. Yes, the per-engagement presell sequence strategy is the way to go in 2015 - pulling folk in with front end value content building that all important relationship factor and enticing them to opt in for more..., then offering them a solution at a lower price as it's the first offer on TY page...and then promoting the opt in throughout your posts starting out with the problem, then turning it into finding the solution (as you have done above, lol!), plus Outbrain to LINK relative content, AND get affiliates on board + repeat with many blog posts and many offers, specially ads via FB and Pinterest Pin posts - man this is a powerful win-win. Makes SO much sense to me - am doing this right from NOW...Will be following your CB success and I'll report back mine... R.
I see the great potential and endless possibilities in making money on line. I also saw the numerous youtube blogs stating how they can help you make thousands of dollars a day. However, the ones I read were a bunch of fluff. I really want to do the CB business but not sure how comfortable I feel about blogging but willing to try it. Do you have a course or a one-on-one you can help me get started.
I have developed what I think is a pretty cool 11-part auto responder series that solves a critical problem people have in my niche - it includes a number of affiliate links as well (although not clickbank - yet). I currently have a squeeze page set up which I'm driving traffic to through using FB ads, but I'm finding that I'm having to pay way too much for every conversion ( > $1.50 per conversion).
Don’t exhaust all the information about the product with your link. Offer enough information to your readers so they know what the link is, but I don’t recommend giving too much detail on your own site for a two reasons. First, product information, like price, often changes. If you mention the price on your site and someone clicks over and finds a different price, it’s confusing. Second, many times, the product details and features are better explained by the makers of the product. It’s best to stick to your own experience on your site.
If your domain is your address, hosting is like the actual house within which your site will live. It's your own little slice of the internet — the place where all your website files live. Hosting is very affordable these days, so don't unnecessarily scrimp on costs. Go with a reputable, reliable provider because your affiliate marketing business depends on it. 

Many affiliate programs will often run promotions with good discounts or giveaways that might be attractive to your audience. For example, if you're an Amazon Associate and the site have a big Holiday Sale, it would be the perfect opportunity for you to promote discounts to your website visitors. This is a great way to promote your offers while also providing good value to your audience. 
When promoting affiliate offers, just make sure you are fully aware of all the terms and conditions attached to your affiliate program. Some programs can be strict about how they allow you to promote their products. For example, some may limit you to banner ads and links only, while others will allow you to use paid advertising, but won't allow email marketing. 
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